Parkinson disease

Pregnancy
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By Claire Henchcliffe MD DPhil

Very little objective data exist to guide management of Parkinson disease during pregnancy. If Parkinson disease symptoms are mild, pregnant women may stop their medications during pregnancy. When symptomatic care is needed, monotherapy is advised if possible, and levodopa is often considered the most effective single therapy for Parkinson disease. No specific teratogenic effects of antiparkinsonian medications are established in humans. With the exception of amantadine, antiparkinsonian medications have been associated with only rare complications during pregnancy. Some reports suggest that parkinsonism can be exacerbated during pregnancy (Hagell et al 1998; Shulman et al 2000).

In This Article

Introduction
Historical note and nomenclature
Clinical manifestations
Clinical vignette
Etiology
Pathogenesis and pathophysiology
Epidemiology
Prevention
Differential diagnosis
Diagnostic workup
Prognosis and complications
Management
Pregnancy
Anesthesia
References cited
Contributors