Meningiomas

Differential diagnosis
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By Wendy Sherman and Jeffrey Raizer

The differential diagnosis of meningioma depends entirely on the suspected anatomic location of the tumor. No single symptom is diagnostic of a meningioma. Benign meningiomas grow slowly over years, and produce symptoms when they encroach on critical structures. These symptoms evolve gradually in contrast to the typical rapid symptom development in anaplastic astrocytoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, glioblastoma multiforme, metastases, primary central nervous system lymphoma, and medulloblastoma. In malignant meningiomas, which represent approximately 10% of meningiomas, symptoms may develop more rapidly.

In This Article

Introduction
Historical note and nomenclature
Clinical manifestations
Clinical vignette
Etiology
Pathogenesis and pathophysiology
Epidemiology
Prevention
Differential diagnosis
Diagnostic workup
Prognosis and complications
Management
Pregnancy
Anesthesia
References cited
Contributors