Haemophilus influenzae meningitis

Introduction
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By Jeffrey A Rumbaugh MD

Meningitis is the most serious form of Haemophilus influenzae infection, historically causing significant mortality and morbidity, especially among children. Vaccination against H influenzae type b has dramatically decreased the impact of this disease, making recognition more difficult when it occurs. In this article, Dr. Jeffrey A Rumbaugh, from the Division of Neuro-Infectious Disease at Johns Hopkins University, reviews the clinical manifestations and pathophysiology of H influenzae infection, with emphasis on the key features useful for making a timely diagnosis. Recent research has elucidated the factors involved in the inflammatory response to this organism, and new PCR-based techniques for confirming the diagnosis have been developed. The most recent vaccination guidelines and current treatment recommendations are discussed.

In This Article

Introduction
Historical note and nomenclature
Clinical manifestations
Etiology
Pathogenesis and pathophysiology
Epidemiology
Prevention
Differential diagnosis
Diagnostic workup
Prognosis and complications
Management
Pregnancy
Anesthesia
References cited
Contributors